My food history # 8 – The 1980s Healthy Eating (Core Foods) Pyramid

Healthy Eating Pyramid 1986 Australian Nutrition Foundation (now known as Nutrition Australia)

 

Mid 1980s – A turnaround in my diet to Friendly Food

Sorting out the family diet after the RPAH protocol for food sensitivities (1) was at first daunting and confusing. The prime objectives were to get my son well, establish his symptoms due to diet and the culprit foods, then exclude only those foods. This final modified diet was to become the ‘friendly’ diet (2) we grew to know, of foods that were safe for my son to eat without him becoming ill. However, I also wanted the family diet to be a ‘healthy’ diet in fulfilling long-term objectives of preventing diseases that plagued my parent’s generation: heart disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes. The longer-term family diet also had to be nutritionally adequate, palatable, fit in with the family lifestyle and be socially acceptable. How could I meet all those objectives?  Continue reading “My food history # 8 – The 1980s Healthy Eating (Core Foods) Pyramid”

My food history # 7 (part 2) – food sensitivities – food challenges – proving the culprit foods

 

Photo 31-1-18, 12 07 10 pm
Dried apricots are high in salicylates and contain sulphites.

Continuing my story on food sensitivities

The Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) Exclusion Diet (1)

I underwent the RPAH exclusion diet protocol in 1985. On the exclusion diet I felt ‘withdrawal’ effects of flu-like symptoms, aching joints, sore throat, cough, tinnitus (ringing in ears), teeth-grinding and headaches. I became edgy, uptight and lethargic. As symptoms settled, I became clear-headed, alert and energetic with natural colour in my cheeks, a change from my previous pale complexion with black rings under my eyes. Food cravings (for fruit) vanished. I became extremely calm, relaxed and organised. My blood pressure was 110/70. I was ready to perform the food challenges.

Disclaimer: Please note – an exclusion diet protocol including challenges should only be done under the supervision of a medical practitioner. Other reasons for symptoms need excluding before diet is tried. Some people may experience severe symptoms to challenges. In some instances these need supervision by a medical practitioner or in hospital.  Continue reading “My food history # 7 (part 2) – food sensitivities – food challenges – proving the culprit foods”

My food history # 7 – food sensitivities – my shattered ideal of a healthy diet

 

apple

Shattered ideals

After my father had a heart attack, our family diet changed to avoidance of fatty red meat, full-fat milk and butter to one including more fish, chicken and vegetable oils. Those messages and promotion of fibre and fruit, and less refined cereals and sugar stuck with me. Thus, when I started out on motherhood I had high ideals of a healthy diet being wholegrain cereals, vegetables, fruit; and avoidance of excess fat, salt, sugar and refined cereals.

My ideals came crashing down when my second son was a failure to thrive, suffering chronic ill-health from the introduction of solid food. After a three year battle, I sought advice from a specialist at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney. An exclusion diet and series of food challenges (1), proved he was sensitive to salicylates, amines and some food additives (colours, preservatives and MSG). Salicylates are flavour components of many fruits, juices and vegetables. Amines occur in cheese, chocolate, bananas and yeast extracts. On a diet removing those foods he became well and gained weight.

Disclaimer: Please note – an exclusion diet protocol including challenges should only be done under the supervision of a medical practitioner. Other reasons for symptoms need excluding before diet is tried. Some people may experience severe symptoms to challenges. In some instances these need supervision by a medical practitioner or in hospital. 
Continue reading “My food history # 7 – food sensitivities – my shattered ideal of a healthy diet”

My food history # 5 – Fighting fit 1970s – fibre – fruit – free of sugar

Photo 8-1-18, 12 00 08 pm

The diet advised to our family after my father’s heart attack swapped foods, rather than restricted food types. Instead of butter for spreads, we used soft margarine. Instead of beef dripping for cooking, we used safflower or sunflower oil. Instead of full-cream milk and full-fat cheese, we used skim milk and cottage cheese. Instead of beef, lamb and sausages we ate chicken and fish. Grilling of meats replaced deep-frying. There wasn’t much difference in advice given for cereals, fruit and vegetables. The same British diet pattern remained. Cereals for breakfast. Sandwiches for lunch. Meat or fish and three vegetables for dinner. Fruit for snacks. Occasional celebrations. Continue reading “My food history # 5 – Fighting fit 1970s – fibre – fruit – free of sugar”