My food history # 12: Critical events and life catastrophes …

 

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In the 1980s and 1990s, life was skipping along …

Then came the dark events – life catastrophes

As well as significant milestones and some major disruptions, over fifteen years from 1998 to 2013,  I lived through several crises and some distressing catastrophes. A crisis, whilst painful, tends to be a temporary situation or turning point (1), whereas a catastrophe is a complete upheaval (2). Both are demanding and stressful. Continue reading “My food history # 12: Critical events and life catastrophes …”

My food history # 10 – 1990s – combining ‘friendly’ food with ‘healthy’ food makes a bland basic (yet healthy) diet

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Bread, rice, pasta, oats, potatoes, rolled/puffed wholegrain cereals become the base foods of meals in my longer-term diet. Photo by Leonie Elizabeth 01 March 2018.

Following my nutrition studies and some sideline research, I made changes to my diet: Continue reading “My food history # 10 – 1990s – combining ‘friendly’ food with ‘healthy’ food makes a bland basic (yet healthy) diet”

Living through history. Our changing food environments. 1950s – 1970s.

 

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While I was growing up and in the years as a young adult, as my own family mainly consumed home-prepared foods, garden-grown vegetables and eggs from our back-yard hens; swirling all around me were economic improvements and major shifts in social norms, a prelude to the storm that was to become a complete restructure of our food environments within a generation.

Working and walking

In my parents youth, in the 1930s and 1940s, times were tough with the depression, World War 2, and food rationing. The 1950s through to the 1970s were decades of relative improved prosperity. My father worked full-time. Initially he rode a bicycle to work. In the 1950s only 10% of families had cars. (2) Gradually we became a one-car and in the 1960s a two-car family. My mother was a homemaker, as the majority of women were in the 1950s. There were no modern appliances. Housework took many hours with washing, ironing, sweeping, cleaning, and chopping wood. The evening meal was cooked over many hours. In the 1950s, women averaged 77 hours per week housework. (2) As children we walked to and from school, except on rainy days when we caught the bus. After school we rode bikes around the neighbourhood or played in the back yard. Continue reading “Living through history. Our changing food environments. 1950s – 1970s.”

My food history # 3. Late 1960s – times are a-changing.

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In 1966 it was my first year at high school. The biggest difference for me, in regards to food, was that snack foods could be purchased from the school canteen: confectionery, chocolates, chips, crisps, nuts, pies, and sausage rolls. In primary school only sandwiches and fruit were available, except once a week on Mondays. Needless to say, I revelled in this new-found freedom of being able to purchase lollies. Every. Single. Day. Continue reading “My food history # 3. Late 1960s – times are a-changing.”